5.02.2012

Fels Naptha

After getting some comments from Carolyn Renee and Nancy about the harmful ingredients in Fels Naptha and the company's disregard for inquiries on ingredients, I took it upon myself to do some in depth internet research. I did find that the old recipe for FN contained "Stoddard." Here is a summary of that.
Chronic toxicity testing has not been conducted on this product. However, the following effects have been reported on one of the product's components. Stoddard solvent: Repeated or prolonged exposure to high concentrations has resulted in upper respiratory tract irritation, central and peripheral nervous system effects, and possibly hematopoetic, liver and kidney effects.
          Stoddard solvent is another name for mineral spirits, which are, like petroleum distillates, a mixture          of  multiple chemicals made from petroleum. Exposure to Stoddard solvent in the air can affect your nervous system and cause dizziness, headaches, or a prolonged reaction time. It can also cause eye, skin, or throat irritation. 

Here is the current ingredient list as listed on felsnaptha.com

Soap (sodium tallowate*, sodium cocoate* (or) sodium palmate kernelate*, and sodium palmate*), water, talc, coconut acid*, palm acid*, tallow acid*, PEG-6 methyl ether, glycerin, sorbitol, sodium chloride, pentasodium pentetate and/or tetrasodium etidronate, titatium dioxide, fragrance, Acid Orange (CI 20170), Acid yellow 73 (ci43350) 

I did a bunch of research on these ingredients... Everything seems safe in reasonable quantities, and when we are talking about diluting them into 2-5 gallons of water, that seems reasonable. Now on the other hand, the ingredients for Dr Bronner's lavender castile soap (bar) as as follows:

Organic Coconut Oil*, Organic Palm Oil*, Sodium Hydroxide**, Water, Lavandin Extract, Organic Olive Oil*, Organic Hemp Oil, Organic Jojoba Oil, Organic Lavender Oil, Salt, Citric Acid, Tocopherol

I don't know about you, but I don't need to do any research to understand what those ingredients are, well with the exception of tocopherol, which is a synonym for Vitamin E. Dr Bronners is also certified organic, not tested on animals, contains no animal derived ingredients, is also certified fair trade. 

So the conclusion??? I think I will be paying the 4 extra dollars for Dr Bronners castile soap and even though my laundry will cost 4 cents/load rather than 1 cent/load, I am OK with that.

9 comments:

  1. Thanks for disecting! I use Dr. Bronners for things, and then I heard the Mountain Rose Herbs sells their Castile Soap in bulk which will ultimately save you even more $$$ :)

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    1. I will have to look into that! Do you order their stuff online? Or is it local to you?

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    2. Mountain Rose Herbs is located in Eugene Oregon, just an hours drive for me! I will check them out next time I go to Eugene. They also have a web page and are on Facebook

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  2. Wow, thanks for doing the research. Now why couldn't "I" find that information. Well, to my defense, it WAS a long time ago I tried to look it up. Right? Right. I'm sticking with my story :)

    If it weren't for the fact that I still have about a half-dozen bars of Fels Naptha left, I'd start making the laundry soap with the more natural castile soap. At least now I know not to buy any more. Thanks Tiny! :)

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    1. Hahahahaha, you always make me laugh! Yeah, that sounds like a good story... That is a lot of FN left to use... at least 5 years worth of laundry in my house!

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  3. Thanks for the info! I never thought about Bronners. I got a free bottle recently! Love the stuff...

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  4. I wonder if FN caused my daughter's wheezing... Interesting info! I will try experimenting with other soaps.

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  5. I use the Dr. Bronners stuff as well...I buy it by the case and it costs about $2/bar that way from Frankferd's farm foods...you can also buy it at trader joes for around $2.50 but they only sell peppermint...which is a bit refreshing.

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  6. Tallowate is rendered beef fat, and it probably comes from large CFO's (Confined Feeding Operations) where the animals are not only treated inhumanely, but injected full of hormones and antibiotics.

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